An argument of aristotle on eudemonia as the highest good in the book nicomachean ethics

From the point of view of self-sufficiency the same result seems to follow; for the final good is thought to be self-sufficient. When he makes friends, and benefits friends he has made, he will be aware of the fact that such a relationship is good for him.

He explained that it was necessary not to aim at too much accuracy at the starting point of any discussion to do with controversial matters such as those concerning what is just or what is beautiful. Lawmakers also work in this way, trying to encourage and discourage the right voluntary actions, but don't concern themselves with involuntary actions.

This virtue is a must to obtain because courage requires judgments to be made. He is convinced that the loss of this private sphere would greatly detract from a well-lived life, but he is hard put to explain why.

That virtues of character can be described as means[ edit ] Aristotle says that whereas virtue of thinking needs teaching, experience and time, virtue of character moral virtue comes about as a consequence of following the right habits.

We saw earlier that the conventional Greek concept of arete is not quite the same as that denoted by virtue, which has Christian connotations of charity, patience, and uprightness, since arete includes many non-moral virtues such as physical strength and beauty.

The pleasure of drawing, for example, requires both the development of drawing ability and an object of attention that is worth drawing. The question we have now discussed confirms our definition.

Aristotle presents various popular conceptions of the best life for human beings. If so, we must try, in outline at least, to determine what it is, and of which of the sciences or capacities it is the object. But is practical wisdom the only ingredient of our ultimate end that has not yet been sufficiently discussed?

Now if the function of man is an activity of soul which follows or implies a rational principle, and if we say 'so-and-so-and 'a good so-and-so' have a function which is the same in kind, e. And any chance person-even a slave-can enjoy the bodily pleasures no less than the best man; but no one assigns to a slave a share in happiness-unless he assigns to him also a share in human life.

For, to put the matter generally, they do not even know what kind of thing it is nor what kinds of things it is about; otherwise they would not have classed it as identical with rhetoric or even inferior to it, nor have thought it easy to legislate by collecting the laws that are thought well of; they say it is possible to select the best laws, as though even the selection did not demand intelligence and as though right judgement were not the greatest thing, as in matters of music.

That is why he stresses that in this sort of study one must be satisfied with conclusions that hold only for the most part b11— Since there are evidently more than one end, and we choose some of these e.

Eudaimonia

Finding the mean in any given situation is not a mechanical or thoughtless procedure, but requires a full and detailed acquaintance with the circumstances.

And as in the Olympic Games it is not the most beautiful and the strongest that are crowned but those who compete for it is some of these that are victoriousso those who act win, and rightly win, the noble and good things in life.

The two accounts are broadly similar. By contrast, Epicurus holds that virtue is the means to achieve happiness. Solon, too, was perhaps sketching well the happy man when he described him as moderately furnished with externals but as having done as Solon thought the noblest acts, and lived temperately; for one can with but moderate possessions do what one ought.

Ascribing eudaimonia to a person, then, may include ascribing such things as being virtuous, being loved and having good friends. Their life is also in itself pleasant. Now each man judges well the things he knows, and of these he is a good judge. There is another contrast with Plato that should be emphasized: This resembles what Plato suggests by the virtue of justice in that the whole society will be productive if everyone follows their daimon Book IV, Republic.

According to Aristotle, what remains and what is distinctively human is reason. Since every sense is active in relation to its object, and a sense which is in good condition acts perfectly in relation to the most beautiful of its objects for perfect activity seems to be ideally of this nature; whether we say that it is active, or the organ in which it resides, may be assumed to be immaterialit follows that in the case of each sense the best activity is that of the best-conditioned organ in relation to the finest of its objects.

The Nicomachean Ethics

Now since activities differ in respect of goodness and badness, and some are worthy to be chosen, others to be avoided, and others neutral, so, too, are the pleasures; for to each activity there is a proper pleasure. Rather Stoicism emphasizes states such as justice, honesty, moderation, simplicity, self-discipline, resolve, fortitude, and courage states which Christianity also encourages.

As an example of this we have the lawgivers of the Cretans and the Spartans, and any others of the kind that there may have been.

Aristotelian ethics

Aristotle's search for the good is a search for the highest good, and he assumes that the highest good, whatever it turns out to be, has three characteristics:Nicomachean Ethics is a philosophical inquiry into the nature of the good life for a human being.

Aristotle begins the work by positing that there exists some ultimate good toward which, in the final analysis, all human actions ultimately aim. As Aristotle argues in Book II of the Nicomachean Ethics, the man who possesses character excellence does the right thing, at the right time, and in the right way.

Bravery, and the correct regulation of one's bodily appetites, are examples of character excellence or virtue. 1. Preliminaries. Aristotle wrote two ethical treatises: the Nicomachean Ethics and the Eudemian kaleiseminari.com does not himself use either of these titles, although in the Politics (a36) he refers back to one of them—probably the Eudemian Ethics—as “ta êthika”—his writings about kaleiseminari.com words “Eudemian” and “Nicomachean” were added later, perhaps because the former was.

A summary of Book I in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Nicomachean Ethics and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Aristotle discusses pleasure in two separate parts of the Nicomachean Ethics (book 7 chapters and book 10 chapters ).

Aristotle's Ethics

Plato had discussed similar themes in several dialogues, including the Republic and the Philebus and Gorgias. Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics Questions and Answers.

The Question and Answer section for Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

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An argument of aristotle on eudemonia as the highest good in the book nicomachean ethics
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